Monthly Archives: November 2018

Original Sin

The Doctrine of Original Sin says that what people are at the core of their being is filthy, disgusting sinners. The most basic fact about you is that you are a piece of filth, rotten to the core. You are so rotten that you nauseate God.

Why are you that way? Is it because you choose to sin? No. You are that way because God made you so that you could do nothing but sin. But even though God made you so that you could not help but sin, God still holds you accountable for sin and wants to burn you in hell for it.

That, believe it or not, is the foundation on which Protestant and Roman Catholic beliefs are based. All of Protestant and Roman Catholic Christianity start with that one belief, the belief upon which everything else is based. That’s where both start.

But that leads to a horrible picture of God. It also leads us to have a horrible picture of ourselves, and it leads us to have a horrible picture of others.

Let’s leave all that behind and consider something different!

For a transcript of this podcast, click here.

The Trinity

The idea of the Trinity prevents Christians from seeing God the way Jesus taught us to see God—as being like the best human fathers. It’s interesting to go back in Christian history and see how and why the idea of the Trinity developed, and what it was originally intended to mean. Ancient Christians were struggling to come up with an understanding of exactly who Jesus was. The idea of the Trinity emerged from that.

Although Western Christianity does not realize this, their view of the Trinity eventually morphed into the belief that there are three separate Gods. But are there really three separate Gods? Does the main God, the Father, want to burn us in hell but can’t because His Son Jesus stands in the way?

This podcast offers you an opportunity to rethink what you’ve heard about the Trinity and also rethink the picture of God the Trinity paints.

For a transcript of this podcast, click here.

Jesus and Social Problems

Why did Jesus not address the social injustices and inequities of His time? Slavery, the relegation of women to second-class status, cruel and inhumane punishments, just to name a few—all these things were common in Jesus’ day, yet He did not criticize them. Jesus reserved practically all of his criticism for the religious leaders. Why did He ignore the societal injustices and go on a campaign against the religious leaders?

Christians have given various answers to that, none of which are satisfactory. And so we must look at this question in a different light. When we do that, we’ll find something that has implications for how we live our daily lives–the things you do make who you are, and who you are will follow you for all eternity.

For a transcript of this podcast, click here.